POWER-GEN 2014 – What you’ll see from SoftInWay

Powergen 2014December is already upon us, which mean Power-Gen International is right around the corner. As we finalize preparations, we’d like to share a sneak peek at what we’ll be showing at this year’s conference. SoftInWay has just released a new version of its design, analysis, and optimization software. AxSTREAM V 3.3 consists of enhancements and fully new features to improve the turbomachinery design process. These updates are the result of our client requests and collaborations. Here’s a look at a partial list of the new features:

  • Users can now design radial turbines at the conceptual design phase in rotor + stator + volute configurations.
  • They can calculate the influence of the heating working fluid through the compressors walls and the option to add radial heat exchangers in the flow path.
  • AxSTREAM V 3.3 has a new fluid toolbox allowing the creation of fluid files using NIST-defined pure and mixed fluid, as well as model combustion gases using custom fuels.
  • Users can calculate both the interference diagram for various rotation speeds and the stress in sections while accounting for root, shroud, disk, lashing wires, and even splitter blades.
  • There is a new library of attachments in AxSTRESS to allow shorter design time due to existing root and the opportunity to update blade geometry while maintaining predefined attachments.

Stop by booth #4854 to learn more about these features! SoftInWay CEO, Dr. Leonid Moroz, will also be speaking at the conference on Wednesday, Dec. 10th at 1:30. He will be presenting his latest paper, “A New Concept to Designing a Combined Cycle Cogeneration Power Plant,” written with SoftInWay Director of Engineering, Dr. Boris Frolov, and Mechanical Engineer, Dr. Maksym Burlaka.

Interested in scheduling an appointment with us at Power-Gen? Contact us at info@softinway.com. We’ll see you there!

Which gas turbine is the best for my combined cycle power plant conversion?

combinedcyclesThe goal of this test case is to find the gas turbine necessary to produce 58 MW of total net power for the conversion of a steam turbine to a combined gas-steam cycle while providing the highest level of cycle thermal efficiency.

The exhaust gases from the gas turbine are used to heat up steam through three HRSGs (Heat Recovery Steam Generators) in series. The steam is then used in the studied steam turbine which is comprised of two “cylinders” in series.
Continue reading “Which gas turbine is the best for my combined cycle power plant conversion?”

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