Mesh Generation Characteristics for an Accurate Turbomachinery Design

This post will examine the meshing requirements for an accurate analysis of flow characteristics in terms of turbomachinery applications, based on Marco Stelldinger et al study [1]. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) are widely used for the analysis and the design of turbomachinery blade rows.  A well-established method is the application of semi-unstructured meshes, which uses a combination of structured meshes in the radial direction and unstructured meshes in the axial as well as the tangential direction. Stelldinger’s paper presents a library for turbomachinery meshing, which enables the generation of semi-unstructured meshes for turbomachinery blade passages, including cavities, fillets and varying clearance sizes. The focus lies on the generation of a mesh that represents the real geometry as accurately as possible, while the mesh quality is preserved.

The above was achieved by using two different approaches. The first approach divides the blade passage into four parts. Inside of these parts, a structured grid is generated by solving a system of elliptic partial differential equations. The second approach is based on the domain being split into fourteen blocks. It has benefits concerning computational time towards the first one, because of a faster generation procedure as well as a faster performance of the inverse mapping.

Mesh View
Figure 1 Mesh View

Another key aspect in mesh generation is the improvement of the mesh quality applying suitable methods. Since mesh smoothing algorithms have been shown to be effective in improving the mesh quality, two smoothing algorithms, a constrained Laplace smoothing and an optimization-based smoothing were presented. Both algorithms showed benefits concerning the achieved mesh quality compared to the standard Laplace smoothing, while the computational time is longer. For the investigated turbomachinery meshes the constrained Laplace smoothing is exposed as the most feasible choice, because of a suitable combination of mesh quality and computational time.

Several methods for the modelling of fillets between blade and the casing were also presented. The methods provide meshes with different qualities, that results into different convergence rates and residuals. Furthermore, the axisymmetric surfaces are dependent on the axial position that enables the modelling of clearances with a variable size. CFD simulations for a variable stator vane with a constant clearance size between blade and inner casing as well as with a variable clearance size were performed. The results show a different flow behavior near the clearance. This emphasizes the requirement of an accurate representation of the real geometry for CFD simulations of turbomachinery flows.

mesh-view
Figure 2: AxCFD mesh view

The AxCFD module of the AxSTREAM platform allows the user to employ an automatic turbomachinery-specific, structured hexagonal meshing by customization in the setup period. Different types of mesh generation are available and can be refined in each direction. Take some time to use AxSTREAM and enjoy the design process!

Leave a Reply