Attend the Turbo/Pump Symposia 2015 in Houston, Texas

Next month, the 44th Turbomachinery & 31st Pump Symposia will take place at the George R. Brown Convention Center in Houston Texas. The exhibition opens on Monday, September 14th, until Thursday, the 17th. The symposia are hosted in order to inspire knowledge exchange among industry professionals, along with professional development, technology transfer, and networking.

SoftInWay will be attending the symposia and exhibiting in booth #2637. Here’s what we are looking forward to the most:

  • Training courses led by top industry experts
  • Lectures, tutorial, case studies, discussion groups, and short courses
  • Exhibits including full-sized equipment and the latest industry innovations
  • Networking and knowledge exchange with fellow turbomachinery and pump professionals

We are also excited to show attendees what we have developed in the last year. Here at SoftInWay, we are constantly building our industry knowledge and software capabilities. We’ll be offering extensive software demonstrations in our booth. Be sure to stop by (and ask about our portable phone chargers)!

Need a free pass to attend the exhibition? You can get yours here. We’ll see you there.

Upcoming Rotor Dynamics and Bearings Webinar

Join us for our next free webinar on September 3rd, 2015!

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Rotor manufacturers seek design aspects which will lead to the maximum level of reliability. These aspects include support, which is most effectively provided by journal bearings, a vitally important component of a turbine. Without the journal bearing and rotor accurate analysis, it can be risk of catastrophic machine damage. Turbine components must be closely checked and kept stable for optimal and safe performance.

Our next webinar  will highlight our emerging applications for turbomachines, compressors, and other mechanisms used with rotors and journal bearings. The interacting influence of bearings on the dynamic behavior (rotor dynamics) of machinery will be reviewed and illustrated by the construction of analytical models.

The session will include:

  • Brief introductions to Rotor and Journal Bearings construction and their roles in the turbomachinery industry.
  • Introduction to Rotor Dynamic and Journal Bearings analyses.
  • Program application presentation and description capabilities and properties.

Who should attend?​

  • Engineers working in turbomachinery interested in calculating and optimizing machine rotor dynamics
  • Engineers interested in improving machine life and performance with optimal bearings
  • Engineering students interested in the future of turbomachinery design and optimization.

We hope you can attend! Register by following the link below.

Register

 

New Release: AxCYCLE v. 4.0

We have just released the newest version of AxCYCLE, our software tool for thermodynamic cycle design and analysis. AxCYCLE 4.0 has some brand new features that will inevitably aid you in designing optimal Gas, Steam, Combined, Turbocharger, Supercritical CO2, Organic Rankine, and Waste Heat Recovery Cycles.

Take a look at the latest updates and additions:

Turbine Efficiency Calculation
In previous versions of AxCYCLE, efficiency was an input parameter that needed to be changed manually for each off-design condition. The Calculated Efficiency option will automatically recalculate the efficiency for off-design conditions.

blog - axcycle 4.0

New Components
Several new components were added to the AxCYCLE library for more sophisticated and customizable cycles.

Bearing: Used to simulate mechanical energy losses in bearings. The estimated mechanical losses are assigned as a power value and are accounted for in the total energy balance

Gearbox: Used to simulate the mechanical energy transfer between two shafts considering mechanical energy losses in the gearbox. These losses are measured using a gearbox efficiency value.

End Seal: Used to simulate seal leakage. The value of the leakage depends on the difference between the upstream and downstream pressure.

Steam Cycle Builder
AxCYCLE’s new wizard for the creation of basic steam cycles. It can be used for steam cycles with regenerative heating, optional moisture separators, and re-heaters. The Builder creates a cycle diagram with the correct fixed conditions and initial values, meaning the generated cycle is ready for calculation! It does all of the work for you!

Learn more about AxSTREAM and AxCYCLE on our website, or email us at info@softinway.com to find out exactly how we can help with your next turbomachinery project.

How much more can I get with what I have?

Gas turbines are continuing their trend in becoming more efficient with each generation. However, the rate at which their efficiency increases is not significant enough to match more and more constraining environmental goals and regulations. New technologies like combined cycles therefore need to be used to increase cycle-specific power (more power produced without burning additional fuel).

The first generation of combined cycles featured a bottoming steam cycle that uses the heat from the gas turbine exhausts to boil off water in order to power a turbine and generate power. This traditional approach has been around since about 1970 and nowadays allows obtaining an additional 20% in cycle thermal efficiency (40% in simple gas turbine cycle configuration vs. 60% as a combined gas-steam cycle).

Figure 1: General efficiency increases over time for simple and combined cycle gas turbines
Figure 1: General efficiency increases over time for simple and combined cycle gas turbines
Figure 2: Example of a simple, recuperated Brayton, supercritical CO2 cycle that uses the exhaust flow of a gas turbine to heat its working fluid
Figure 2: Example of a simple, recuperated Brayton, supercritical CO2 cycle that uses the exhaust flow of a gas turbine to heat its working fluid

While this traditional approach is definitely effective, it does have some drawbacks; the equipment usually takes a significant amount of 3D space, there is always the risk of corrosion and substantial structural damage when working with 2-phase fluids, and so on. This, therefore, allows for different technologies to emerge, like supercritical CO2 cycles.

A supercritical fluid is a fluid that is used above its critical pressure and temperature and therefore behaves as neither a liquid nor a gas but as a different state (high density vs gas, absence of surface tensions, etc.). As a working fluid, supercritical CO2 has numerous advantages over some other fluids, including a high safety usage, non-flammability/toxicity, high density, inexpensiveness and absence of 2-phase fluid.

 

Figure 3: Example of difference in power density between supercritical carbon dioxide (left) and steam (right) for a 10 MW power turbine
Figure 3: Example of difference in power density between supercritical carbon dioxide (left) and steam (right) for a 10 MW power turbine

Moreover, steam turbines are usually difficultly scalable to small capacities which mean that they are mostly used in a bottoming cycle configuration for high power gas turbines. On the other hand supercritical CO2 (Rankine) cycles can be used for smaller machines as well as the bigger units while featuring an efficiency comparable to the one of a typical Rankine cycle and estimated lower installation, operation and maintenance costs.

Figure 4 Cycle efficiency comparison of advanced power cycles (source: A Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Cycle for Next Generation Nuclear Reactors. Dostal, V., 2004
Figure 4 Cycle efficiency comparison of advanced power cycles (source: A Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Cycle for Next Generation Nuclear Reactors. Dostal, V., 2004

The paper I presented at the ASME Power & Energy 2015 compares different configurations of SCO2 bottoming cycles for an arbitrary case for different boundary conditions before applying the selected cycle to a wide range of existing gas turbine units. This allowed determining how much additional power could be generated without needing to burn additional fuel and the results were far from insignificant! For the machines studied the potential for power increase ranges from 15% to 40% of the gas turbine unit power. Want to know how much more power you can get with your existing machines? Contact us to get a quote for a feasibility study before designing the waste heat recovery system yourself or with our help.

Event Roundup: Turbo Expo 2015

Another ASME Turbo Expo has come to an end. This year’s event, held in Montréal’s Palais des Congrés, brought together thousands of turbomachinery professionals from around the world.

Valentine Moroz presents
Valentine Moroz presents on the uses of crowd-souring

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The conference offered many events and sessions covering a wide range of topics. These included:

– Cycle Innovations
– Heat Transfer
– Microturbines & Turbochargers
– Structures & Dynamics
– Turbomachinery

Did you miss SoftInWay’s stage presentations or tutorial session? 

Find the content of our Stage Presentations below:

Crowdsourced Innovation – A Next Generation Integrated Software Environment for Turbomachinery Cycle & Component Design, Analysis, & Optimization 
View Presentation >>>

Leveraging Cross-Industry Know-How for Thermodynamic Cycles & Turbomachinery Component Innovation
View Presentation >>>

You can also view live recordings of all three presentations on our YouTube channel!

See members of our team, including Valentine Moroz, Abdul, Nassar, and Leonid Moroz, present SoftInWay’s latest work to Turbo Expo attendees.

Watch Crowdsourced Innovation  with Valentine Moroz.

Watch Leveraging Cross-Industry Know-How with Abdul Nassar.

Design & Evaluation Considerations of WHR Technologies with Leonid Moroz, Clement Joly, Abdul Nassar, and Valentine Moroz, will be up shortly!

Plan Your Turbomachinery Training for the Rest of 2015

The sun is starting to shine and the weather is warming up. The schools are closed, the beaches are open, and everyone is itching to get to their vacation. But summer will be over before we know it! Don’t wait too long to begin planning for the final months of 2015. Take a look at our fall and winter courses that are now open for registration. Early sign-ups qualify for discounted prices! Here’s what’s available for the rest of the year:

Classroom Courses:

Centrifugal Compressor Design
September 15-19 | Zug, Switzerland (Register)
October 5-9 | Boston, MA, USA (Register)

Axial & Centrifugal Pumps Design
September 22-26 | Bangalore, KA, India (Register)
December 14-18 | Boston, MA, USA (Register)

Stream & Gas Turbine Design
September 22-26 | Boston, MA, USA (Register)
November 23-27 | Zug, Switzerland (Register)

Turbocharger Design & Performance Matching
October 12-16 | Bangalore, KA, India (Register)

Axial Compressor Design
November 23-27 | Bangalore, KA, India (Register)

Online Courses (click the dates to register!):

AxCYCLE for Organic Rankine Cycle Design
July 9-10, September 3-4, November 12-13

Waste Heat Recovery Design (Last of the year!)
July 13-30

AxCYCLE for Steam & Combined Cycle Design
July 28-29, September 10-11, November 4-5

AxCYCLE for Supercritical CO2 Cycle Design
August 4-5, October 27-28

Axial Turbine Design (Last of the year!)
August 10-20

Axial Compressor Design
September 21-October 1

Turbocharger Design
November 30-December 17

Also don’t forget about our monthly webinars! Keep an eye out for email invitations to our live presentations and demonstrations of the industry’s latest trends and developments. You can find all of our recorded webinars in our learning portal – SoftInWay Turbomachinery University. Your free registration gives you access to all recordings!

Turbo Expo 2015 – What We’re Excited For

In a few weeks, SoftInWay will be on its way to Montreal, Canada for ASME’s Turbo Expo! We are looking forward to a busy and exciting conference.

What we’re most excited for:

1. Montreal AfterWork: Professional Networking Event
This event is being held for professionals involved in Energy, Technology, Finance, and Startups to meet and network in a casual and enjoyable environment. All Turbo Expo attendees and local Montreal professionals are welcome to come by, have a drink, and chat about the latest developments in their field!

Date/Time: 6:30-9:00pm | Tuesday, June 16, 2015
Location: Santos Tapas Bar | 191 Rue St Paul W, Montreal, QC, H2Y1Z5 Canada
Attire: Business Casual
Registration: www.zurichafterwork.com/rsvp/

2.  SoftInWay Stage Presentations

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Demystifying “Pushbutton” Approaches for CFD & FEA Turbomachine Design

Demystifying “Pushbutton” Approaches for CFD & FEA Design, Analysis, Redesign, & Optimization of Turbomachines

centrifugalcompressordesignAlthough there is not just one way to design a turbomachine there sure is one way not to do it; blindly.

A misconception that I commonly see when teaching engineers about fundamentals of turbomachines, as well as when leading design workshops, is that some engineers (mostly the younger generations) envision themselves plugging numbers, pushing buttons and getting results immediately without any real brain power behind their actions.

Nowadays, software packages are an integral part of an engineer’s toolkit, but in the same way that a mechanic would not (or should not) use a screwdriver as a hammer, each software has its own applications and ways to use it.

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Turbochargers in Formula 1

The history of turbochargers in Formula 1 is pretty fascinating. Turbochargers were initially introduced in 1905, applied to large diesel engines in the 1920’s and found their way into commercial automobiles in 1938. However, it took a few more decades for the turbochargers to be used in Formula 1 car racing.

When Renault decided to enter the sport in 1977, they started their engines based on the novel turbocharger concept. As one would expect, their first design suffered from constant reliability problems through all the races it competed in. As Renault focused their development entirely on the engine, the car’s aerodynamics worsened; it suffered a huge turbolag under acceleration, and when the boost finally triggered the tires were not able to handle it [1]. “So the engine broke and made everyone one laugh”, Jean-Pierre Jabouille, the driver, admitted in an interview. At the time, everyone was looking at the turbo engines as something that no one would ever hear about again.

MMR, twin turbocharged GT500 V8 engine, from Mustangs Daily [3].
MMR, twin turbocharged GT500 V8 engine, from Mustangs Daily [3].
From theJUDGE13 [2].
From theJUDGE13 [2].
 

 

 

 

 

 

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Innovation in Aerospace: Aircraft Compressor Design

Aerospace - croppedOur next webinar is on Thursday, April 30th! Are you an engineer involved in the Aerospace Industry and its latest development, a manager interested in improving the performance of your aircraft engines, or a student interested in the future of aerospace and the current climate of the industry? You should attend! During the webinar we will be taking a close look at the most recent trends and developments of compressors in aircraft engines with a focus on the key factors for the successful development of aircraft engines.

Key factors for successful development of aircraft engines include technological viability, performance, and re-usability. As one of the industry’s most high-technology products, aircraft engines require innovation in manufacturing and especially in design. They also face the need for continuous development in its technical capabilities in terms of achieving not only higher efficiencies and reliability but also safety and environmental legislations.

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