Simultaneous Design for Turbocharger Compressors and Turbine Wheels

AxSTREAM Blade Profiling
Figure 1- AxSTREAM 3D Blade Profiler for Radial Designs

Increasing regulation for reducing emissions has forced the automotive industry to accept different technologies over the years in order to stay ahead of the market. In an industry that is so accustomed to internal combustion engines, new solutions such as electric motors and turbocharger systems have allowed experts in other industries to cultivate an influence in the automotive market. Specifically in the realm of turbomachinery, increased development has gone into designing turbochargers in order to minimize the effect and size of internal combustion engines. Design challenges are inherent in the fact that an engine is a positive displacement device whereas the turbocharger falls under aerodynamic turbomachinery. The two separate machine types have distinctly different flow characteristics, and the proper sizing of a turbocharger for its parent engine requires proper modeling of the engineering system as a whole.

In general, initial turbocharger sizing becomes a matter of obtaining the necessary boundary conditions required for a preliminary design. A thermodynamic cycle analysis of an ICE-Turbocharger system will allow the designer to obtain an initial idea of the bounds

Axmap for turbocharger
Figure 2 – Simultaneous Turbine (color) and Compressor (dotted) Maps – Power vs. MFR (left) & Pressure Ratio vs. MFR (right)

necessary for the compressor and turbine design. Given the engine information, necessary inlet conditions of the compressor such as temperature and pressure, efficiencies required, and heat transfer of the system, the user can then obtain the boundary conditions for the turbocharger compressor and turbine wheels.

From this point, the process becomes an exercise in turbomachinery design and analysis. With SoftInWay’s turbomachinery design and analysis platform, a boundary condition realization of the system eventually manifests into a full 3D design of the turbine/compressor wheel. Once the engineer designs both the turbine and compressor wheels, they will be left with two discrete physical systems. However, these two designs must eventually coincide into a harmonious system that accurately represents the “turbocharger”. In order to facilitate this representation, the user can overlay the different compressor and turbine maps based on a number of varying parameters. Given the Power and Pressure Ratio curves for a number of varying shaft speeds and temperatures, an off-design performance of the turbocharger system can be analyzed via AxSTREAM’s matching module (Figure 2). Another simultaneous analysis of the turbine and compressor wheels must be made on the component that connects them, the rotor. Rotor design, rotor dynamics, and bearings analysis are crucial to a legitimate turbocharger design and will be a topic of a next week’s blog post. If you would like to learn more about turbocharger design and analysis methods, please follow this link

References:
http://www.automotive-iq.com/engine/articles/high-boost-and-two-stage-turbo-power-systems

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